1. troubled:

hayley barker
  2. atavus:

    Thomas Struth - Pergamon Museum, Berlin, 2001

  3. museumofmisandry:

Medea(detail), William Wetmore Story, 1868, marble

    museumofmisandry:

    Medea(detail), William Wetmore Story, 1868, marble

  4. archaicwonder:

10th Century Viking Pendant of Thor’s Hammer
Cast with details added in silver filigree, the front decorated with a face mask at the top, the hair, eyes and mouth in spiral beaded silver wire, the nose a horizontal stripe of plain wire, the body bordered with lines of wire, with spiral motifs and applied dots in the field, pierced horizontally through the head for suspension on a thick ring with interlocking spiral terminals.
Valued at $8,000 - 11,000

    archaicwonder:

    10th Century Viking Pendant of Thor’s Hammer


    Cast with details added in silver filigree, the front decorated with a face mask at the top, the hair, eyes and mouth in spiral beaded silver wire, the nose a horizontal stripe of plain wire, the body bordered with lines of wire, with spiral motifs and applied dots in the field, pierced horizontally through the head for suspension on a thick ring with interlocking spiral terminals.

    Valued at $8,000 - 11,000

  5. thedeity:

Museum of Broken Relationships, Zagreb, Croatia

    thedeity:

    Museum of Broken Relationships, Zagreb, Croatia

  6. post-impressionisms:

Sketch, Two Nautch Girls, Edwin Lord Weeks. 

    post-impressionisms:

    Sketch, Two Nautch Girls, Edwin Lord Weeks. 

  7. 
I’m not your brother. I never was.

    I’m not your brother. I never was.

  8. backyardolivetree:

Falling Sketch by Clara Lieu (2010)

    backyardolivetree:

    Falling Sketch by Clara Lieu (2010)

  9. my-water-lilies:

Boulevard des Capucines, Claude Monet.

    my-water-lilies:

    Boulevard des Capucines, Claude Monet.

  10. orphaeum:

The Reconciliation of Marie de Medici and Her Son, Peter Paul Rubens (1621).

    orphaeum:

    The Reconciliation of Marie de Medici and Her Son, Peter Paul Rubens (1621).

  11. inebriatedpony:

         No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
         -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

thm.